Teachers talk about the pressures of taking on a leadership role | Education Support

Coronavirus update: Throughout this crisis we're here to provide mental health and wellbeing support to all education staff. Find out more.

Senior school leaders and headteachers - BBC Teach

Teachers talk about the pressures of taking on a leadership role

In this new film, teachers share their thoughts and feelings about taking on a more senior role within their school.

For those making the transition from a teacher to a manager it can be a stressful experience. As one teacher explains: “Forget your career, forget all the selfish stuff. You get it wrong and this is a kid that could be affected. Yeah, that is really scary.”

And the loneliness and isolation, as one senior leader admits, can be tough: “There is nobody else at times that you can go and talk to about your day."

Many senior leaders and headteachers feel overwhelmed negatively impacting their mental health and wellbeing. Our Teacher Wellbeing Index found that senior leaders reported the highest levels of stress, with 84% describing themselves as stressed in 2019, up from 80% in 2018 and 75% in 2017. 

Here’s a short extract from the film – to see more go to bbc.co.uk/teach

This new film, part of the BBC Teach support resources, is accompanied by a blog called 5 tips for surviving as a new leader by leadership consultant and former headteacher Jill Berry. She says "headship is a great privilege. It offers you the opportunity to make a difference on a scale unlike any other you will have ever experienced, and that is thrilling. What you say and do will affect countless young people, and adults – staff, parents, governors and perhaps members of the wider community."

How we can help 

If you need support, remember, you can always call our free and confidential 24/7 emotional support helpline on 08000 562 561. 

Our Headspace and Yourspace service offers a safe and confidential environment for school leaders to develop the most effective leadership behaviours and learn from each other, using action-learning and problem-solving techniques. Find out more.