Resources | Education Support
Coronavirus update: We continue to be here to provide mental health and wellbeing support to all education staff.

Resources

Balancing rocks

Work-life balance is something that is often spoken about in the education sector, but is often difficult to achieve. Read our guide to help you find that ever-elusive sweet spot of a work-life balance.

Teacher with a pupil

This guide provides advice and information on how to effectively manage classroom behaviour. 

We have developed a new helpline poster for teachers and education staff during this current crisis. Please share to ensure that education staff both current and retired areaware that they can get emotional support from our confidential helpline.

Dealing with caring responsibilities - teachers and education staff

Here's some information about what you can do to get support if you have caring responsilibities. 

Talking to colleagues about mental health - teachers and education staff

The skills to have healthy conversations about mental health and wellbeing are key to creating a culture where people feel valued, cared for and supported.

activities to manage stress - teachers and education staff

These ideas will decrease stress and improve your emotional wellbeing. 

Teachers and education staff endure greater job-related stress than other professionals, according to recent research. However there are a number of tools and techniques to help manage and reduce stress. 

managing technology - work life balance education staff

A good work-life balance is about being able to concentrate well on the task in hand whether at school or out of work and our devices can often prohibit this. Here are some tips to better manage your technology so you can focus better:

Dealing with illness - education staff

Dealing with a chronic or serious illness can feel overwhelming and bring around many unwanted changes. It can often make us feel powerless and out of control. 

Dealing with bereavement- education staff

Bereavement can leave people feeling panicky, frozen, depressed, angry and a whole host of very overwhelming feelings. There is no one way to grieve and sometimes it can affect people years after the death happened, especially if they did not mourn at the time.